bulldogpottery:

Amber Float, Yunomi, by Samantha Henneke, Bulldog Pottery, Seagrove, North Carolina

bulldogpottery:

Amber Float, Yunomi, by Samantha Henneke, Bulldog Pottery, Seagrove, North Carolina

(via fired-earth)

marumotostaff:

for a perfect teatime ♡

(via fired-earth)

brambledragon:

thegr8dictator5:

My newest piece :)

Holy shit, that’s brilliant.

brambledragon:

thegr8dictator5:

My newest piece :)

Holy shit, that’s brilliant.

(via fired-earth)

and-thou-said:

astonishing-moments:

Steve Sanchez

This is perfection…… No point disagreeing with me, I am right.

and-thou-said:

astonishing-moments:

Steve Sanchez

This is perfection…… No point disagreeing with me, I am right.

(via fired-earth)

potterybyjohnfoster:

Did a coupe of Raku firings this week , this is one from Tuesday

(via fired-earth)

potterybyjohnfoster:

A couple from Fridays Raku, crackle texture with crackle glaze

potterybyjohnfoster:

A couple from Fridays Raku, crackle texture with crackle glaze

erikkwakkel:

Sharing a binding
This is a clever book from the 18th century, printed in Oxford in 1756. It presents both the Old and New Testament, although the books are not bound together the regular way, behind one another. Instead, the binder opted to place them next to each other. This very rare binding technique is part of a family that includes the dos-à-dos (or “back to back”) binding, which I blogged about before (here). Having the two testaments bound this way allowed the reader to consult passages from both books at the same time. Indeed, the empty pages in the front and back are filled with notes, including in what looks like Greek and Hebrew. It appears this clever binding had a reader to match.
Pic: Manchester, Chetham’s Library (source).

erikkwakkel:

Sharing a binding

This is a clever book from the 18th century, printed in Oxford in 1756. It presents both the Old and New Testament, although the books are not bound together the regular way, behind one another. Instead, the binder opted to place them next to each other. This very rare binding technique is part of a family that includes the dos-à-dos (or “back to back”) binding, which I blogged about before (here). Having the two testaments bound this way allowed the reader to consult passages from both books at the same time. Indeed, the empty pages in the front and back are filled with notes, including in what looks like Greek and Hebrew. It appears this clever binding had a reader to match.

Pic: Manchester, Chetham’s Library (source).

(via fired-earth)

japaneseaesthetics:

Netsuke: Autumn grasses with praying mantis, 18th century, Japan Attributed to the artist RyûsaCarved ivory; H. 7/8 in. (2.2 cm), Diam. 2 1/8 in. (5.4 cm) Gift of Mrs. Russell Sage, 1910 (10.211.1271).  MET

japaneseaesthetics:

Netsuke: Autumn grasses with praying mantis, 18th century, Japan

Attributed to the artist Ryûsa

Carved ivory; H. 7/8 in. (2.2 cm), Diam. 2 1/8 in. (5.4 cm)

Gift of Mrs. Russell Sage, 1910 (10.211.1271).  MET